Conway's Bush

This 2.32 ha forest near the Waihi River has been a Forest & Bird reserve since 1988. The land was donated to the society by the late Stanley Conway, and was fenced off in 1977.

Aerial view of Conway's Bush.

Aerial view of Conway's Bush.

Conway’s Bush, along with Arowhenua Bush, is one of the few remaining areas of lowland forest, and is home to regenerating totara, matai and kohikatea, along with broadleaf species such as tarata, kaikomako, kahikatea, horoeka and kapuka.

Conway’s Bush is a nationally significant area, as it contains the largest population of one plant species restricted to the Geraldine area. This is the “acutely threatened” Melicytus “Waihi”, a local porcupine shrub which grows up to two meters in height and has small, spiny branches.

Conway's Bush is home to the largest population of Melicytus "Waihi"

Conway's Bush is home to the largest population of Melicytus "Waihi"

Each November and April a working bee, or “Care Day” is held at Conway’s Bush by a team of volunteer “Weedbusters”. Branch members and other helpers remove plant pests such as ash, sycamore and holly.  Weedbusters are greeted with impressive bird songs, thanks to healthy populations of bellbirds, shining cuckoos and grey warblers. “Conway’s Bush is a special place” says Margaret McPherson, branch secretary and regular Weedbuster. “The concert from the bellbirds all day long makes weeding less of a chore”.

If you are interested in taking part in a working bee, please contact Margaret McPherson on: (03) 686 1494 or email her.